Camouflage

Saying my father’s name to most people in my father’s country brings about a flurry of respect for the man he was.

But I am just his daughter.

I have done nothing but carry his name with me throughout my life and this gives me pause

because

I am just his daughter.

My family history is filled with so many colorful tales of the greatness my father achieved and I rode along on his coattails basking in the glory that was him. Leaving because of the coup, I never had a chance to be anything

but

just his daughter.

And still… knowing what my father’s name means to many people, I feel like I have something to live up to now that he’s gone; and even before then, though I did nothing about it. Though I still do nothing about it. I haven’t been back to my father’s country since I was 5 years old, but they know me… 35 years later, they know my name. To them, I have descended from greatness, but to me

I am just his daughter.


Writing101 Day9; Camouflage


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11 thoughts on “Camouflage

  1. I really enjoyed the movement of this poem, Jessica. Each stanza becomes more and more detailed, provides more information. The repetition of “just my daughter” pulls it all together. Your placement of that phrase on the “paper” also conveys that being his daughter is just a side note for his history. It makes me want to know about this daughter’s history. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this poem.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. This is a beautiful poem that touches the heart. I agree with LuAnne, though I would add that each repetition makes the statement “i am just his daughter” all the more powerful and the stanzas in between imbue that simple phrase with different connotations and, evokes different emotions each time that phrase repeats. Very powerful poem. Is it fictional?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Under the camouflage of a father’s name which is actually a birthright. However, people sometimes expect that if a father or mother is great automatically the assumption is that the child must be like the parents which is erroneous. What if the child chooses to walk a different path? Intriguing take.

    Liked by 1 person

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